Recipes

Classic Recipe No. 131 —

Corpse Reviver #2

Corpse Revivor

In my line of work, the occasional over-indulgence is nearly inevitable. There are plenty of odd concoctions touted as hangover cure-alls from sushi and coca-cola to greasy burgers and kale juice, but none so enthusiastically recommended as the trusty “hair of the dog” remedy. I can’t say I believe fully in its effectiveness, but the “like cures like” philosophy dates back to the days of Aristophanes:

Take the hair, it’s well written,
Of the dog by which you’re bitten;
Work off one wine by his brother,
And one labour with another…
Cook with cook, and strife with strife:
Business with business, wife with wife.
— Aethenæus

Effective as a hang-over cure or not, it never hurts to add a great classic to your brunch repertoire.

The Corpse-Reviver family of drinks has unclear origins, but what we do know is they are mentioned in cocktail books as early as 1871 in The Gentleman’s Table Guide (an interesting read in its own right). This version, the Corpse Reviver #2, was included in Harry Craddock’s famous Savoy Cocktail Book published in 1930. He wrote, “To be taken before 11 a.m., or whenever steam and energy are needed.”

The drinks pack a punch! Enjoy, but keep Craddock’s warning in mind, “Four of these taken in swift succession will quickly unrevive the corpse again.”

Recipe

  • 1 oz gin
  • 3/4 oz Cointreau
  • 3/4 oz Lillet Blanc
  • 3/4 oz fresh lemon juice
  • An absinthe rinse
  • Garnish with a Luxardo cherry

Add all ingredients into a shaker except for the garnish. Shake with ice. Rinse your chilled cocktail glass with 3 drops of absinthe. Discard any excess absinthe. Strain your shaker into the cocktail glass. Garnish with a cherry.

4 Notes on Corpse Reviver #2

  1. I’ve always been a fan of tylenol for the headache, pepto bismol for the nausea, dramamine for the dizziness, and a 5 hour energy for the B vitamins as a hangover cure. Plus tons of water, most important part.

    I find too that quality plays a big part in how I feel in the morning too. I’ve noticed that martinis made with Whistling Andy gin give me more of a headache than Dry Fly gin, same with cheapo vodka compared to Tito’s.

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